VIDEOS

 

hand on djembe

Djembe connections galore are on the Web!

LINKS – YouTube Videos – Local Music too!

 

Dufferin – SD #73 – Music Festival, Gr. 5/6 2012 (vid#1 – close ups) 

A parent kindly filmed our Gr. 5/6 (Mrs. Ritcey) students performing “Wimoweh”. We had the opportunity to explore the warm sounds of the marimba and the echo of the xylophones. The students’ recorder playing and voices communicated beautifully.  22 of the 28 students that could make the performance all teamed up and helped with the parts that we needed for that morning’s performance. Awesome job! Many thanks to Lori Jane Froese for the loan of the marimba and xylophones.

Women’s Warrior Song – a model of the First Nations song we are learning.

UJAMMA Drum Circle on March 11th

Women’s Warrior Song

Wey hey hey … ho key yo ho, ho key yo ho

Wey hey ho key yo, ho key yo ho wey hey

Ho key yo

scribed/presented by Rhyannon Alexander

4 rounds;  x3 with drum, x1 no drum, hands up last round

(ho key is on one beat)

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     International Women’s Day – Bread & Roses remake by Queen Cee


Bread and Roses

(Lyrics: James Oppenheim; Music: Martha Coleman or Caroline Kohlsaat)

As we go marching, marching, in the beauty of the day,
A million darkened kitchens, a thousand mill lofts gray,
Are touched with all the radiance that a sudden sun discloses,
For the people hear us singing: Bread and Roses! Bread and Roses!

As we go marching, marching, we battle too for men,
For they are women’s children, and we mother them again.                                              Our lives shall not be sweated from birth until life closes;
Hearts starve as well as bodies; give us bread, but give us roses.

As we go marching, marching, unnumbered women dead
Go crying through our singing their ancient call for bread.
Small art and love and beauty their drudging spirits knew.
Yes, it is bread we fight for, but we fight for roses too.

As we go marching, marching, we bring the greater days,
The rising of the women means the rising of the race.
No more the drudge and idler, ten that toil where one reposes,
But a sharing of life’s glories: Bread and roses, bread and roses.

Our lives shall not be sweated from birth until life closes;
Hearts starve as well as bodies; bread and roses, bread and roses.

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A History of Bread and Roses

BREAD AND ROSES
Textile workers, Lowell, MA

New Year’s Day, 1912, ushered in one of the most historic struggles in the history of the American working-class. On that cold January 1st, the textile workers of Lawrence, Massachusetts, began a nine-week strike which shook the very foundation of the Bay State and had national repercussions.

In its last session, the Massachusetts State Legislature, after tremendous pressure from the workers, had finally passed a law limiting the working hours of children under the age of 18 to 54 hours a week.

Needless to say, the huge textile corporations had viciously opposed the law.

As an act of retaliation, the employers cut the working hours of all employees to 54 hours, with a commensurate cut in wages, of course. The workers in the Lawrence factories, some 35,000 of them, answered this with a complete walk-out.

The strike itself was unique on many counts, but principally because the workers realized that they had to ignore the existing craft-union set-up. The craft unions were composed only of skilled, English-speaking workers, which excluded most of the workers. Instead, under the leadership of the International Workers of the World (IWW), a blow was struck on behalf of industrial unionism with the uniting of all textile workers in the strike. In the course of the strike, the workers presented the bosses with the following demands:

* A 15 per cent wage increase;
* Abolition of the “premium system* (a version of present-day “incentive plans”);
* Double pay for overtime;
* No discrimination against strikers;
* An end to speed-up;
* An end to discrimination against foreign-born workers.

The song was inspired by one of the demonstrations which took place during the course of the strike. During a parade through Lawrence, a group of women workers carried banners proclaiming “Bread and Roses”.

This poetic presentation of the demands of women workers for equal pay for equal work together with special consideration as women echoed throughout the country.

James Oppenheim, many of whose poems reflect a working-class content and sympathy, picked up the phrase and made it into a poem. Martha Coleman set the poem to music, and the song has become a part of the singing tradition of the American working-class.

The song is more than an interesting piece of historic literature is a song for today, for the complete emancipation of women, who still demand “Give Us Bread — And Give Us Roses!”

 

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WORLD RHYTHM –

This Video shows the birth of African rhythm, a great watch!  Don’t miss this one!

RHYTHM “FOLI” THERE IS NO MOVEMENT WITHOUT RHYTHM, ORIGINAL VERSION

 YANKADI Ensemble & Dancers –YouTube Video


A very beautiful dance, very clear! DJDJ loves doing this Yankadi ensemble in the 6/8ths time, it really sways and is meditative. Then like a blast the 4/4 fast beat comes in and then it’s back to the sway. It’s a lot of fun. Check out this dance group found on YouTube.

If you are interested in joining a group that wants to get together to African Dance please contact Cynthia or Lisa at djembedjango@hotmail.com

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OKANAGAN RHYTHM FESTIVAL – Kelowna BC – ORF ’12 is June 22nd & 23rd

Stay tuned for the agenda and registration

Okanagan Rhythm Fest – ORF ’12

Okanagan Rhythm Festival  2009 Performance. “Small Change”  A  cool duo!

Rhythm Festival  2009  – Closing Drum Time- Bobby Bovenzi & ORF Troupe